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Chromebleed – A Handy Heartbleed Warning System

Here at BestVPN, we think there are plenty of good reasons to use Google Chrome as your Web browser. We particularly like the pared-down interface and fast performance.

There’s now another good reason to choose Chrome in the aftermath of the controversial Heartbleed security scare, in the form of a very useful new plug-in that will alert you if you browse to any sites that are still affected by the bug.

The tool, named Chromebleed, is available free of charge from the Chrome Web Store. At the time of writing it’s already been implemented by more than quarter of a million people.

Here is some practical advice on how to best make use of the tool:

1. Download the tool from the Chrome Web Store here.

2. Install the tool to your Chrome browser. This is a simple case of giving the app permission to install and the process happens in seconds. The tool will work on any version of Chrome, including both the Windows and Mac versions.

3. Browse the Web as normal. If you surf to any site that is still affected by the Heartbleed vulnerability, a warning alert will pop up in the Chrome browser, as shown in the image below.

Vuln

In addition, if you search Google, any sites that are potentially vulnerable will be identified with a Heartbleed logo, warning you to be careful about proceeding.

4. If you encounter any affected sites, proceed with caution, especially if the site is one you log on to and provide personal details. You may wish to contact the site owners / administrators to alert them to the fact their site is vulnerable.

5. If you have a user account on any affected site, you should return to it at a later date and change your logon and password details, once the Chromebleed plugin no longer reports that the site is vulnerable. Conventional wisdom dictates that it’s perhaps better not to change your password while a site is still at risk, as this could reveal both your old AND new logon details to any potential hackers.

If you use Google Chrome, installing the Chromebleed plugin is a bit of a “no-brainer” – it costs nothing and will help you protect your personal information.

 


Ben Taylor Ben was a geek long before "geek chic," learning the ropes on BBC Micros, before moving on to Atari STs and IBM compatibles. He was "online" using a 1200bps modem before the Internet was even a thing. Now, after two decades in the industry, he writes about technology for various publications, operates a few websites of his own, and runs a bespoke IT consultancy based in London.

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